The Mayku FormBox: Bring Your Ideas to Life

Are you looking to bring your ideas to life? Then you’ll be interested in the startup company called Mayku, and their revolutionary product: The Mayku FormBox.

The Mayku FormBox is a desktop vacuum former that works with any vacuum cleaner and a host of different materials. You can use the Mayku FormBox to make moulds in minutes with no extra software or digital model manipulation needed.

It’s a simple way to turn your ideas into a reality.

As Asgradia sets up habitable platforms in low-Earth orbit we will need to produce as many necessities in space as possible instead of bringing supplies from Earth, thus this invention could prove useful.

3D printing is becoming more and more popular as lower-cost, faster, and more complex machines are rolled out to the market. However, there are still many challenges to overcome. For example, 3D printed products can still be somewhat expensive to make, the process is slow, and printers still use a lot of energy.

But, the Mayku FormBox could address all these problems. The product is the brain-child of Mayku, the British startup. They are calling their product “the world’s first tabletop factory”—and the hope is to change the way manufacturing functions.

Although the FormBox is not quite a 3D printer, the company claims it is “the smallest, most affordable and accessible vacuum former in the world.” The kit includes a FormBox vacuum former, 30 sheets of material, a universal vacuum connector, and some instructions—no software needed.

Co-founder Alex Smilansky explained that they formed the company Mayku because they wanted to change the way things are made. Mayku wants to help the world move from large factories shipping items all over the world, to a network of mini ones making what is required where it’s needed.

Smilansky added that they hope FormBox, and other machines in their pipeline, will help to catalyze a shift towards local making that is already bubbling up with the maker movement.

The company also stated that their mission is to “do for making, what the Mac did for home computing” by allowing the creation of customized products to be fast and accessible, and necessitating nothing more than a vacuum and a tabletop.

The FormBox works by heating a sheet of plastic and laying it over a 3D form, then using the vacuum to suck out the air resulting in an air-tight seal. The sheet then cools and makes a mould of the shape in seconds. Users can also use the product as a mould to craft other products.

Here’s an overview:

Vacuum-powered – uses any vacuum cleaner as its source of suction.
Compact – measuring just 30 x 22 x 40 cm, it fits on a desktop.
Fast – turns flat materials into 3D shapes in less than 20 seconds.
Multiple objects – cast many creations using vacuum-formed moulds.
Turbocharge your 3D printer – vacuum-form 3D prints to multiple in seconds.
Works with a variety of materials – select from a vast library of different substances.

As per Smilansky, if you were to try to make a mould like the FormBox’s product with current technology like a MakerBot, the process would be much more complicated. First, the user would have to go into CAD to model the shape, and then cut it out from a box and draft the negative space, and then print that. After that, the user would still have to sand it down, use it as their base and pour concrete into it. This process could take over eight hours.

Of course, the FormBox is less than a fraction of the time allowing users to create many more moulds and thus many more innovations.

For more information follow them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

If you’re intrigued by the idea of living in space and the way that technology and startups can help us accomplish this then join Asgardia today and connect with forward-looking people.

When preparing news, materials from the following publications were used:

https://www.mayku.me/

https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/gadgets/a20693/formbox-vacuum-powered-desktop-replicator/

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-maykus-formbox-could-kill-3d-printing-for-at-home-makers/

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Image Credit: FabrikaSimf / Shutterstock

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